International Heights

 

Agility Jumping Heights – FCI Countries

 

 

Note from Cathy McDonald
Note from Kerstin McDonagh

Argentina
Australia
Australian National Kennel Council Ltd.
Agility Dog Association of Australia Ltd.
Canada
Denmark

Finland

France
Germany
New Zealand
Norway
Russia
Slovenia
Sweden
Switzerland
USA
American Kennel Club (AKC)
United States Dog Agility Association (USDAA)

Note from Cathy McDonald

In most European countries (FCI shows) it’s just small, medium & large, the same as the UK, but according to the FCI rules they can set the jump height between from 55cm up to 65cm, it’s just that most judges don’t and if they do its for the FCI grade 1 classes.

 

Note from Kerstin McDonagh

In many FCI member countries (certainly all of the Scandinavian ones), progression from one grade to the next is completely different from the UK. All dogs, regardless of previous handler experience start in Grade 1, ie there are no classes for “new dogs and handlers”. This means that new dogs and handlers tend to spend more time in Grade 1 than UK dog and handlers do in grade 1-3, and many handlers never progress from Grade 1 with their first dog. Progression usually requires the dog to gain a 1st to 3rd place with a clear run 3 times in its current grade, but course times tend to be considerably tighter than here, so this can be quite a challenge – it is not uncommon for placed dogs to have time faults and, therefore, not be able to use a 1st, 2nd or 3rd place for progression. Funnily enough, gaining a national championship title is often considerably easier than here – they do not have separate Championship classes, but hand out CCs in any Grade 3 class. Also CCs are only handed out to dogs which have not already gained a championship title – if the winning dog is titled, the CC is handed to the 2nd-placed dog, and so on down to a certain placing. So the real challenge is often to gain a Nordic championship title or International championship title, which requires handlers to travel to other countries and gain the same qualifications there as they have at home. Also, they use separate progression and titling for jumping and agility classes, so your dog could, in theory, be a Jumping Champion while still competing in Grade 1 Agility. So there’s another challenge – double-titling your dog. Personally, I feel that it’s a simple system which works well at all levels and keeps the fun in agility by making goals achievable while still ensuring that new dogs and handlers gain a good grounding before moving up the grades. Since there is no stigma attached to handlers remaining in Grade 1 for some considerable time, there is also less pressure on handlers to move up the grades – it’s basically seen as an opportunity to gain experience.
Back to the top

 

Argentina

Argentina use the American KC rules/heights  http://www.agility-argentina.com.ar/entrevista-Silvina-Bruera-Pre-WC-2012-eng.php
Back to the top

 

Australia

 

Australian National Kennel Council Ltd

http://www.ankc.org.au/rules.aspx

http://www.ankc.org.au/media/scripts/doc_download.aspx?did=1064

ANKC heights (ie KC/FCI equivalent) are 200mm (dogs up to 270mm), 300mm (dogs 271-365mm), 400mm (366-455mm), 500mm (456-545mm), 600mm (546mm & over).

Back to the top

Agility Dog Association of Australia Ltd

Equivalent to UKA. Rules and Regulations Overview http://www.adaa.com.au/regs/rulesandregs.htm

 

Dog Sizes

There are four different height divisions, which compete separately. All heights are measured at the wither.

  • Toy – Restricted to dogs up to and including 300mm. This height class jumps 250mm in the International Programme and 150mm in the Combined, Junior and Regular Standards. This height class is not offered for Combined Open Pairs and Team events. When this happens the Mini class will be jumping 250mm height and Toy dogs are welcomed to compete in these events. Toy sized dogs are eligible to compete in Mini Classes, subject to the conditions of the competition.
  • Mini – Restricted to dogs up to and including 400mm. The Combined, Junior and Regular Standards jump 250mm. International Programme Standards (Intermediate, Open and Advanced) jump 400mm. Dogs in the International programme are encouraged to enter their dogs in Midi classes (when entering Combined Programme events) where the bar height is 400mm to ensure good jumping style in maintained as the dog begins its agility career.Toy and Mini have more time (higher SCT) to complete a course because of their shorter legs.
  • Midi – Restricted to dogs up to and including 500mm. This height class jumps 550mm in the International Programme and 400mm in the Combined, Junior and Regular Standards. Dogs in the International programme are encouraged to enter their dogs in Maxi classes (when entering Combined Programme events) where the bar height is 550mm to ensure good jumping style in maintained as the dog begins its agility career. This height class is not offered for Combined Open Pairs and Team events. When this happens the Maxi class will be jumping 550mm height and Midi dogs are welcomed to compete in these events. Midi sized dogs are eligible to compete in Mini Classes, subject to the conditions of the competition.
  • Maxi – No restriction in dog height. This height class jumps 650mm in the International Programme and 550mm in the Combined, Junior and Regular Standards.

The Intermediate, Open and Advanced class jump heights were developed to International standards. The Combined, Regular and Junior programme jump heights are offered as an alternate jump height for beginning, less confident or veteran dogs or to encourage various breeds/structures of dogs.

These options preserve the athletic nature of dog agility and provide a safe performance level for the majority of dog breeds.

Back to the top

 

Canada

 

Agility Association of Canada (AAC) Jump Heights

 

From the AAC Official Rule Book v4.0 effective 1 January 2010 http://www.aac.ca/en/rules/_pdf/AAC_OfficalRuleBookV4-(SECURE).pdf

 

Handler’s choice where two heights are indicated.

 

Dog Height Regular Special Veteran
12” or less 10” or 16” (254 and 406mm) 6” (152mm) 6” (152mm)
>12” to 16” 16” or 22” (406 and 560mm) 10” (254mm) 6” or 10” (152 or 254mm)
>16” to 21” 22” or 26” (560 and 660mm) 16” (406mm) 10” or 16” (254 or 406mm)
>21” 26> (660mm) 22” (560mm) 16” or 22” (406 or 560mm)

 

For Veteran class levels, all jumps must be set one or two jump heights lower than would be required in Regular classes. Handlers can opt to have their dogs jump at either allowable height at any given trial, provided they enter and jump the same height for all classes at that particular trial.

 

For Special class levels, all jumps must be set one jump height lower than would be required in the Regular classes.

 

The Veteran class level is for dogs seven years of age or older; or five years of age or older who have been competing in the Special class level for a minimum 12 month period. A dog may no longer compete in the Regular classes once entered in any of the Veteran classes.

 

The Special class level is open to all dogs.

 

 

Summarised from Dianne Ford’s interview A Historical Reflection of the Canadian Experience – (It’s Not All Mounties and Maple Syrup….)

 

In the 1990s the AAC added new classifications (Regular, Special and Veteran) for greater inclusivity and safe extension of agility careers. Specials and Veterans jump lower heights, and Veterans get more time.

 

In AAC the jump height as per the dog’s measurement is the minimum height it may enter. The handler may choose to run the dog at a higher jump height. This supports those preparing for international competition to work at the international height.

 

If the dog’s overall health and physical strength can support it, then they would do specific training prior to the international event to up the jump height (something that with basic jumping foundation isn’t that hard to do). Any Canadian international-level competitors with 22″ dogs would do/have done the 26″ at international competitions. It is a very conscious decision based on fitness and seen as a short-term blip in the dog’s agility career rather than the permanent, multi-trial, multi-year height.
Back to the top

Denmark

The Danes have adopted their own national rules for agility and only apply FCI rules to international events or events related thereto (eg team selection competitions). For international events, they use the same dog sizes as in the UK and FCI rules, as well as the FCI jump height intervals. Interestingly, however, they have adopted a progressive system for their ordinary national competitions. Here, the jump height depends on the dog’s grade. In Grade 1 (equal to our G 1-3), the jumps are 250-300mm for Small dogs, 350-400mm for Medium dogs and 550-600mm for Large dogs. In Grade 2 (equal to our G 4-5/6), they increase the heights to 300-350 / 400-450 / 600-650 mm respectively. In Grade 3 (equal to our G 6-7), the jump heights are 350/450/650mm respectively.

Back to the top
Finland

The Finnish Agility Association’s annual meeting voted for several changes in national rules. New rules will validate at 1st of January in 2018. Here are the most important changes.

New classes for toy dogs and smaller large dogs

Several other coutries have already done this, Finland decided to increase the amount of size classes as well. New classes are: dogs under 28 cm and between 43-50 cm. Dogs in these size categories can compete either at their current class or at avnew size class. Handlers are free to re-choose it for every competition.

Lower jumping heights

According to incoming international agility rules the meeting decided to low jumping heights at all size classes. Changes are for regular jumps and wall jump.

New jumping heights at national competitions

  • SX (dogs under 28 cm) 10-20 cm
  • S (dogs 28-35 cm) 20-30 cm
  • M (dogs 35-43 cm) 30-40 cm
  • L (dogs 43-50 cm) 40-50 cm
  • XL (dogs over 50 cm) 50-60 cm

New jumping heights at tryouts and international competitions

  • S (< 35 cm) 25-30 cm
  • M (35-43 cm) 35-40 cm
  • L (> 43 cm) 55-60 cm

Qualifying results for national championships should be gained from same size class that the dog is competing at the championships.

France

 

From Manda Scott:

There are those who maintain that if we alter our jump heights in the UK, we will adversely affect our status with the FCI and may no longer be able to field a team.  Nobody has offered any concrete evidence for this, and it should be pointed out that the CNEAC (The branch of the French Kennel Club that oversees dog sports) – which is fully affiliated to the FCI – has just changed its jump heights to new heights which differ from the FCI standard.

 

Under CNEAC rules, there are four categories of dog, as follows:-
A – less than 37 cm high
B/D – higher than A and less than 47 cm high (D refers to larger-frame breeds, of which there is an official list)
C – bigger than 47 cm, but not D.

The new French jump heights are:
A – 35 cm
B/D – 45 cm
C – 60 cm
‘Category D’ Breeds are as follows (in French – and some of them are breeds we rarely, if ever, see – but those which are common, have names which translate fairly easily. It’s worth noting that crossbreeds are allowed to compete in France but only in 3 out of the 4 class types; that everyone has to belong to an approved club and competitors must gain the approval of the club’s president before being allowed to compete (at each competition).  All Border Collies, including those that measure into Medium,  have to run in Large.

Category D : Akita Inu, Berger des Abruzes, Berger de Russie Méridionale, Berger d’Anatolie, Berger du Caucase, Berger de Podhale, Bouvier Bernois (Grand), Bouvier Suisse (grand), Bull Mastiff, Bull Terrier, Charplanina, Cao Da Serra Estrella, Cane Corso, Chien Loup de Saarloos, Dogue Allemand, Dogue de Bordeaux, Dogue du Tibet, Dogue Argentin, Eurasier, Griffon Nivernais, Hovawart, Komodor, Korthal, Kuvasz, Landser, Léonberg, Lévrier Afghan, Lévrier Russe (Barzoï), Lévrier Ecossais (deerhound), Lévrier Irlandais (Wolfhound), Malamute, Mastiff, Matin de Naples, Montagne des Pyrénées, Montagne Portugais, Rhodesian Ridgeback, Rottweiler, Saint-Bernard, Sharpei, Terre Neuve, Terrier Noir de Russie, Sharpei

 

So the French have lowered the maximum height for all dogs by 5cm, and in addition, have a large list of heavier breeds who jump at our current ‘medium’ height. Presumably they have considered this in detail and don’t consider that taller dogs of breeds such as the Border Collie which are not in Category D, to be disadvantaged by jumping at the lower height.

They are also full affiliated to the FCI and there is no suggestion that France might not be invited to field a team at FCI competitions.

Back to the top

Germany

Use the height ranges too, so Small is 25-35cm; Medium is 35-45cm; Large 55-65cm. The height they usually use is 60 cm, unless it is a qualifier, then they use 65 cm. If the weather is extreme, very hot or very wet, they use 55 cm. This though is an individual decision of the judge, but it seems nobody has a problem with varying heights.

Back to the top

New Zealand

 

Agility regulations www.nzkc.org.nz/pdf/rules_regs/Agility_Regs.pdf

 

10.1.2 Height of Dogs

10.1.2.1         Micro Dogs Dogs not exceeding 325mm are eligible to complete as Micro Dogs.

10.1.2.2         Mini Dogs Dogs exceeding 325mm but not exceeding 430mm in height are eligible to compete as Mini Dogs.

10.1.2.3         Midi Dogs Dogs exceeding 430mm but not exceeding 520mm in height are eligible to compete as Midi Dogs.

10.1.2.4.        Maxi Dogs All other dogs compete as Maxi Dogs.

 

12.2.1   Hurdles

Consists of a supported bar which is displaceable upon impact. Height of bar from ground 675mm maximum. (Micro, 300mm maximum, Mini 380mm maximum, Midi 570mm maximum). Additional displaceable bars may be added underneath. Bar length 1 metre minimum. Bar weight must not exceed 450 grams per metre. To establish the maximum weight of bars longer than 1 metre, multiply the length in millimetres by 0.45.

 

Note: As from 1 Jan 2009, new hurdles must have a bar which has a length of 1.2m minimum and be of a diameter no less than 30mm. These bars must have stripes or bands of contrasting colour throughout their length. The uprights of new hurdles must be at least 900mm high.

Back to the top

 

Norway

From Kerstin McDonagh: Norwegian Kennel Club – use the FCI jump intervals, ie Small: 250 – 350mm; Medium: 350 – 450mm; Large: 550 – 650mm. I can’t find any mention of them giving small large dogs the option of running over Medium height, but it may be that they this option will be added in the future, once they see how it pans out in Sweden. The Swedes only introduced this option very recently.

Back to the top

 

Russia

Follow FCI regs: 25-35cm, 35-45cm, 55-65cm.

Back to the top

 

Slovenia

Follow FCI regs: 25-35cm, 35-45cm, 55-65cm.

Back to the top

Sweden

 NEW for 2016

The Swedish Kennel Club has now announced that it has accepted the new jump heights proposed by the Swedish Agility Club, which included the addition of 2 new heights. The new heights will be as follows: Extra Small (10-20 cm), Small (20-30 cm), Medium (30-40 cm) Large 40-50 cm and Extra Large (50-60 cm). So in addition to 2 new heights, where the dogs can also compete for champ titles, the jump heights for the 3 “old ” sizes have also been reduced. The same proposal has been submitted to the FCI with the support of several countries.
The dog height categories are: Extra small – under 28 cm, small – under 35 cm, medium – 35 cm but under 43 cm, large – 43 cm but under 50 cm, extra large – 43 cm or over. Handlers with dogs measuring into extra small or large can choose if the want to compete in extra small or small/large or extra large, and have to state this when the dog has its first measurement (which will usually be at its first competition, since any judge can measure the dog so no separate measuring steward is required). The handler has the right to change their mind when the dog had its final measurement.
Thank you to Kerstin McDonagh for the English translation.

Previously, prior to 2017:

All classes are divided into three groups:

  • Small: Allowed for dogs whose height is less than 35 cm
  • Medium: Allowed for dogs whose height is 35 cm and over but under 45 cm
  • Large: Allowed for dogs whose height is 43 cm and above

Dog whose height is measured at over 43 cm but less than 45 cm can participate in medium or large, as determined by the driver at the time of height measurement. Choice of size groups can be changed in the final measurement or re-measurement (see below).

At the international contest, FCI classes followed.

From Kerstin McDonagh: 650, 450 and 350, with handlers given the option of running their small large dogs over 450 jumps instead of 650. The decision is permanent, ie they can’t swap and change between heights according to class availability at shows. These rules apply to national competitions – if trying out for teams going to international events organised by, for example, the FCI, handlers with small large dogs will be expected to try out under the rules applicable to the international event, ie run their dogs over 650 jumps at the try-out, even if they normally run their dogs over 450 jumps. Basically, the Swedes have left it to the handlers to decide what’s best for their dogs, and have no problem with dogs running over a higher jump height at team selection events.

In other words, Sweden has had the sense to realise they can separate their own rules from those applying to international events – something which British agility people seem to find a remarkably difficult concept to grasp! Consequently, in Sweden, agility is not shaped or ruled by the very small number of handlers interested in taking part in international events.

Back to the top

 

Switzerland

Follow FCI regs: 25-35cm, 35-45cm, 55-65cm.

Back to the top

USA

 

American Kennel Club (AKC)

http://images.akc.org/pdf/rulebooks/REAGIL.pdf

 

Handlers may opt to enter in a higher height division for all Regular titling classes, but not in a division lower than their proper height division.

 

8 Inches (203mm) For dogs 11 inches (280mm) and under at the withers.
12 Inches (305mm) For dogs 14 inches (356mm) and under at the withers.
16 Inches (406mm) For dogs 18 inches (457mm) and under at the withers.
20 Inches (508mm) For dogs 22 inches (559mm) and under at the withers.
24 Inches (610mm) For dogs over 22 inches (559mm) at the withers.
26 Inches (660mm) Dogs may be entered at this height at their owner’s discretion.

 

They also have an International Sweepstake Class based on “international rules”. The ISC class shall be split into three (3) separate categories: Small Agility for dogs measuring 13 ¾ inches (349mm) and/or less at the withers, Medium Agility for dogs measuring 16 7/8 (429mm)inches at the withers and/or less, and Large Agility for dogs measuring greater than 16 7/8 (429mm) inches at the withers. As indicated in the equipment specifications for the ISC class, dogs entered in Small Agility jump 14 inches (356mm) in height, dogs entered in Medium Agility jump 18 (457mm) inches in height, dogs entered in Large Agility jump 26 inches (660mm) in height.

 

There are also Preferred Classes, giving opportunities to a greater variety of dogs to compete using modified standards. Dogs may be switched back & forth between Preferred and Regular classes, but not during a show.

 

The following jump heights are used in Preferred classes (ie one height lower than the Regular class height):

 

4 Inches (102mm) For dogs 11 inches (280mm) and under at the withers.
8 Inches (203mm) For dogs 14 inches (356mm) and under at the withers.
12 Inches (305mm) For dogs 18 inches (457mm) and under at the withers.
16 Inches (406mm) For dogs 22 inches (559mm) and under at the withers.
20 Inches (508mm) For dogs over 22 inches (559mm) at the withers.

Back to the top

United States Dog Agility Association (USDAA)

http://www.usdaa.com/rulesReg_ObsReqs.cfm

Note: Two poles are required on each jump in all class levels except Masters; wings must be minimum 36″ and ideally 42″ – 48″ high, and a minimum width of 16″.

A majority of the hurdles utilized must be “winged” hurdles.

Minimum Jump Heights

 

CHAMPIONSHIP PROGRAM
Dog Height Jump Height Long Jump Span
12″ or less 12″ 20″
16″ or less 16″ 36″
21″ or less 22″ 48″
Over 21″ 26″ 60″

 

PERFORMANCE PROGRAM
Dog Height Jump Height Long Jump Span
12″ or less   8″ 12″
16″ or less 12″ 24″
21″ or less 16″ 36″
Over 21″ 22″ 48″

 

 
Back to the top

One Comment

  1. Pingback: Recent additions to the website - are you 4 it !

Leave a Reply